Tag Archives: Falcon Theater

Stage Notes for Feb. 17

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Mike Hall as Gillespie. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Mike Hall as Gillespie in IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

A potpourri of arts news items from local and national sources.

Leave a comment

Filed under Notes

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT Review

Links to all reviews can be found using the REVIEWS link at the top of the page. Blog postings, links and more are available on my Facebook fan page. You can also receive updates on Twitter from @BTCincyRob.

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Mike Hall as Gillespie. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Mchael Hall as Gillespie. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT presented by Falcon Theater through Feb. 28. Click here for more information on the production. I attended the opening night performance.

“They call me, ‘Mr. Tibbs.'”

Falcon Theater brings a riveting production of the racially-charged murder-mystery, IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT, to the stage in Newport.

Derek Snow as Tibbs, Michael as Gillespie. Rich Setterberg as Tatum & Terry Gosdin as the Coroner. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Derek Snow as Tibbs, Michael as Gillespie. Rich Setterberg as Tatum & Terry Gosdin as the Coroner. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Derek Snow does excellent work as Virgil Tibbs, the detective who struggles to maintain his composure amid the near-constant bigotry he is subjected to. Equally engaging is Mike Hall as chief of police Gillespie as he struggles with controlling his own bigotry versus the responsibility of bringing a murderer to justice. Together the two play well against each other, both working toward the same goal and trying to prove to the other their worth.

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Simon Powell as Sam. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Derek Snow as Tibbs & Simon Powell as Sam. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Also very strong is Simon Powell in the role of Officer Sam Wood. I enjoyed the mentoring dynamic he developed with Tibbs, as well as how he handled the pressures of the townspeople’s attitude toward him for working with a colored man. It was interesting to see his response to this morph over the course of the show.

Tom Peters as Purdy & Allison Evans as Noreen.  Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Tom Peters as Purdy & Allison Evans as Noreen. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

The remaining ensemble was very solid and did good work. Of those playing multiple roles, I found Terry Gosdin and Tom Peters to be really strong in distinguishing their two characters.

This production enjoyed solid direction by Ed Cohen with some very engaging scene work. I did find the scene where Tibbs is “attacked” to be confusing. For me, it was not clear what was happening or where it was taking place. I also felt there were a couple of times where the racially-motivated bigotry in the beginning of a scene almost completely disappeared by the end that scene, with the conversation becoming a bit too casual.

Dan Maloney as Pete, James Ball as Ralph & Simon Powell as Sam. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Dan Maloney as Pete, James Ball as Ralph & Simon Powell as Sam. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

The costume design by Tara Willians, worked well and kept the look of the period for me. I would have liked to have seen Dee Anne Bryll (as Melanie), wigged or hair-styled to better reflect the era.

As staged, I found the set changes to be a bit time-consuming and overly complicated. The on-stage base and percussion was a nice concept during the scene changes, but it quickly became a bit repetitive. Also, since the music continued into the scene’s dialogue, I found it to be a bit too loud.

Dee Anne Bryll as Melanie & Rich Setterberg as Endicott. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

Dee Anne Bryll as Melanie & Rich Setterberg as Endicott. Photo by Mikki Schaffner Photography.

During the final confrontation, the cast seemed less-than-conformable with the stage combat so the scene seemed a bit tentative. I did not see a fight choreographer listed in the program.

Overall, it’s a very well-done and intense production that is sadly, still timely given recent events. I understand that ticket sales are extremely strong, so you better act quickly to ensure a seat.

My rating: 4.25 out of 5

I would enjoy hearing what you think about the show or my review. All I ask is that you express your opinion without attacking someone else’s opinion. You can post your comments below.

Leave a comment

Filed under Reviews

Stage Notes for Feb. 12

MATC_Any Given Monday A potpourri of arts news items from local and national sources.

Leave a comment

Filed under Notes

VIDEO: I Lost a Bet:Karate Commercial Featuring Aiden Sims

Aiden Sims.

Aiden Sims in STRIKING 12 at Falcon Theater.

It’s always fun to catch local performers in commercials.

This commercial for www.ilostabet.org features Aiden Sims showing off her karate moves. Her recent performances include STRIKING 12 with Falcon Theater and AND BABY MAKES SEVEN with Queen City Queer Theater Collective.

Next up, Aiden will be working behind the scenes, stage managing THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts.

If you know of any other commercials to highlight, please send the links my way.

Leave a comment

Filed under Video

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT Opens February 13

FT_In the Heat of the Night

Join The Whiskey Shambles Opening Weekend!
CEA Award winning blues artists The Whiskey Shambles are partnering up with us for a very special opening weekend– they’ll be playing from 7:30-8 to open In the Heat of the Night. We’re really excited about this special opening music, and we hope you’ll be there to enjoy it!

Since we closed Striking 12, we’ve been busy both rehearsing In the Heat of the Night as well as creating a brand new environment for our patrons. Join us for In the Heat of the Night, the local premiere of John Ball’s adaptation of the well-known movie, as well as the debut of a few improvements to our theater that should make your experience even more enjoyable!

It’s 1962. A hot August night lies heavy over the small town of Argo, Alabama. A dead white man is discovered and the local police arrest a black stranger named Virgil Tibbs. The police discover that their prime suspect is in fact a homicide detective from California. As it happens, Tibbs becomes the racially-tense community’s single hope in solving a brutal murder that is turning up no witnesses, no motives, and no clues.

We’re excited that Derek Snow, who was last seen in 2013’s Duck Hunter Shoots Angel, returns to Falcon to portray Tibbs and Mike Hall, last seen in The 39 Steps, will portray Gillespie.  Rounding out the cast is a group of Falcon veterans and talented new faces to the Falcon stage, and we think you’ll enjoy director Ed Cohen’s concept and staging, too.  We can’t wait for you to see this important show that is far more relevant today than we even imagined when we picked the show a year ago.“The play is taut and startlingly resonant, even as it deals with events taking place nearly 50 years ago. Pelfrey’s work is economical and uncompromising…suspenseful, thrilling, and stunningly theatrical.” – Nytheatre.com

Directed by Ed Cohen

Cast:

Tibbs – Derek Snow
Gillespie – Michael Hall
Sam – Simon Powell
Pete – Dan Maloney
Melanie – Dee Anne Bryll
Noreen – Allison Evans
Coroner/Mayor – Terry Gosdin
Oberst/Purdy – Tom Peters
Ralph/Kaufman – Jamie Ball
Tatum/Endicott/Jennings – Rich Setterberg

All performances are at Falcon Theatre, 636 Monmouth Street in Newport, Kentucky.  Tickets may be purchased online or by calling 513-479-6783. Tickets are $19 for adults, $17 for seniors or students with valid ID.

Leave a comment

Filed under Press Releases